Amma towers, AN 307-A, Adarsh nagar
Thekkummoodu road, Pattom (P.O),
Thiruvananthapuram
0471- 2550461 / +91 9846571329
General
Extractions and wisdom tooth removals
A tooth which is decayed or damaged, or loose because of gum disease, may have to be extracted (taken out of your mouth). Wisdom teeth sometime have to be extracted if they have come through at an awkward angle and are causing problems. Teeth are sometimes taken out from children’s mouths to help other teeth grow straight, when they are crowded. Some teeth are easier to take out than others. A local anesthetic (an injection in your mouth) will be used to numb the tooth before it is extracted; this is the best treatment for most patients. In some cases, for children or nervous patients, or where a tooth might prove difficult to remove, sedation (something to make you drowsy), along with a local anesthetic may be considered. If a general anesthetic is needed, you will have to go to a hospital (you will normally be able to go home the same day).

Adults can have a maximum of 32 teeth. The wisdom teeth or third molars are the last to come though, right at the back. They usually appear between the ages of 17 and 25. Although sometimes they appear many years later. If there is not enough room, the wisdom tooth many try to come through, but will get stuck against the tooth in front of it. The wisdom tooth will be at an angle, and will be described by the dentist as impacted. The cost of removal of wisdom teeth will vary according to the difficulty of the procedure and whether it is being carried out in a dental practice or hospital. It is always recommended that you get a written estimate before starting treatment.
Extractions and wisdom tooth removals
Root canal treatments
What is root canal treatment?
Root canal treatment (also called endodontics) is needed when the blood or nerve supply of the tooth (known as the pulp) is infected through decay or injury.
Why is root canal treatment needed?
If the pulp becomes infected, the infection may spread through the root canal system of the tooth. This may eventually lead to an abscess. If root canal treatment (RCT) is not carried out, the infection will spread and the tooth may need to be taken out.

Does it hurt?
No. A local anaesthesia is used and it should feel no different to having an ordinary filling done.
What does it involve?
The aim of the treatment is to remove all infection from the root canal. The root is then cleaned and filled to prevent any further infection. Root canal treatment is a skilled and time-consuming procedure. Most courses of treatment will involve two or more visits to your dentist. At the first appointment, the infected pulp is removed. Any abscesses, which may be present, can also be drained at this time. The root canal is then cleaned and shaped ready for the filling. A temporary filling is put in and the tooth is left to settle. The tooth is checked at a later visit and when all the infection has cleared, the tooth is permanently filled.

What will my tooth look like after treatment?
In the past, a root filled tooth would often darken after treatment. However, with modern techniques this does not usually happen. If there is any discolouration, there are several treatments available to restore the natural appearance.

What if it happens again?
Root canal treatment is usually very successful. However, if the infection comes back the treatment can be repeated.

What if I don’t have the treatment?
The alternative is to have the tooth out. Once the pulp is destroyed, it can’t heal and it is not recommended to leave an infected tooth in the mouth. Although some people would prefer an extraction, it is usually best to keep as many natural teeth as possible.

Will the tooth be safe after treatment?
Yes. However, it is better to restore the tooth with a crown to provide extra support and strength to the tooth.

Where can this treatment be carried out?
Root canal treatment is a routine dental procedure, which your dentist will be happy to do for you.

What about aftercare?
Root-treated teeth should be treated just the same as any other tooth. Remember to clean your teeth at least once a day, preferably with a fluoride toothpaste. Cut down on sugary snacks, and keep them only to mealtimes if possible. See your dentist for regular check-ups.
Scaling and polishing
Plaque is a soft, sticky substance that builds up on your teeth. It is mostly made up of bacteria. The bacteria in plaque feed on sugar from food and drink, producing acids as a waste product. The acids attack the teeth by dissolving the minerals in the tooth surface. If this happens too often, tooth decay results. And, if plaque is allowed to build up, the bacteria in it can cause gum disease, making your gums sore and infected. Tartar (also known as ‘calculus’). formed by hardened plaque, helps plaque to gather and makes it harder to remove when you brush.
You can’t remove tartar by just brushing your teeth, but a dentist or hygienist can remove it using special instruments –this is known as scaling. A dentist or hygienist can also polish your teeth. This remove stains from coffee, tea, cigarettes or red wine; and it makes it more difficult for plaque to stick to your teeth. If you clean your teeth very thoroughly at home, your scale and polish treatment will take less time.
Scaling and polishing